When decorating people their homes, offices, and even churches, many buy antique Persian rugs as an investment and because of the bright colors and beautifully hand-woven designs. However, there is much more to many of these designs than meets the eye! Although when some people decorating their homes, offices, and even churches, they buy antique Persian rugs because of the bright colors and beautifully hand-woven designs. However, there is much more to many of these designs than meets the eye! Although some antique rugs have been designed merely because the pattern was aesthetically pleasing, many of the models also have symbolic meanings behind them too.

When diamonds intentionally worked into a design, they may represent women, and pomegranates are almost always used as a symbol of fertility, while peacocks usually associated with immortality. Different flowers and plants are representative of different things; for example, peonies may stand for political power, whereas lotus blossoms can represent, immortality, reincarnation, and rebirth. Tulips may suggest wealth or emotional prosperity while hyacinths can represent renewal. Trees may be woven into a design as a literal depiction of the Tree of Life, which is a multi-cultural symbol of the route from Earth to Heaven (or from Birth to Death).

The colors in antique rugs are also traditionally very representative, although some colors of rugs are now more common than others; in part to keep up with the tastes of Western consumers. Red, which is now one of the best common colors of rug use in many churches, traditionally represented courage, love, happiness, and beauty, while blues and golds represented power and wealth. This is partly because when craftspeople started making and designing rugs thousands of years ago the ingredients used to make blue dyes were so expensive that only very wealthy people could afford to buy blue colored fabrics. Gold was also precious because the gold color in some ancient rugs was sometimes even actually threads of finely spun gold. Historically, green was not used because it was traditionally thought of as a holy color and associated with the Islamic prophet, Mohammed. However, green is now used more and more frequently because it appeals to the tastes of Western consumers. White can represent some different things, such as purity and peace, but it is also representative of death and is viewed by some as a funeral color. Brown represented fertility and a good harvest, while black represented destruction.

These symbols can be interpreted on their own, or the whole rug can view as a whole, and the design can be interpreted more like a story. An example of this could be explaining a rug which depicts white diamonds on a red background, as being representative of the happiness and beauty of pure young females. Another example is a rug showing peacocks amongst the lotus blossoms on a blue background being interpreted as indicating the immortality and rebirth of a wealthy nobleman.

Although this guide to symbolism can help you and many churches of nowadays decipher patterns and meanings in antique rugs, be aware that there are many fake antique rugs on the market, where the design has merely copied from older rugs, with no regards to the intended symbolism. It is also possible that designs from different regions of Iran have slightly different symbolic meanings.

Furthermore, many antique Persian rugs have deeply symbolic designs. Choose an antique Persian rug with a design that you feel connected to.have been designed merely because the pattern was aesthetically pleasing, many of the models also have symbolic meanings behind them too.